The Noktuku Living Moss Clock – An Update.

A lot of design blogs were buzzing about the Reindeer Moss Clock concept last year. The wall-mounted clock whose face is covered with real reindeer moss from Norway has changed a bit since then and here’s the latest info. Read more

The Alarm Dock By Jonas Damon Is Today’s Technology Wrapped In A Throwback Style.


Remember those faux wood grain and plastic colored flip clocks that sat on every bedside table just a couple of decades ago? This Alarm Dock designed by Jonas Damon for AREAWARE is a throwback to the days of those bedside flip clocks.


above: Examples of popular bedside flip clocks from the 70s and 80s by General Electric, Krups and Sunbeam

The Alarm Dock uses a nostalgic product language to meet the progressively thin and disappearing profiles of consumer electronics. It is at once a critique and an accommodation to new technology. Made from sustainably harvested new growth Beech Wood, the Alarm Dock comes in 9 finishes:


above: Phone in photo not included. Dock does not have built-in electronics or speakers.

Place an iPhone or iPod Touch running a flip clock app onto the dock, and see an iconic and meaningful form return to your nightstand, mantel, or shelf. Your iPhone or iPod’s dock connector can be pulled through it, allowing your device to recharge while docked.


Fits iPhone 3G, 3GS, 4 and 4S. Does not fit iPhone 5.
Material: Sustainably Harvested New Growth Beech Wood
Dimensions: 6.75 x 3.5 x 2.5 inches

Extra US, UK, and EU cord/charger sets available. If your cord/charger set is from an older model, it may not fit the Alarm Dock.

Where to buy :
•Available for pre-order in black or natural beechwood for $35 at Areaware
•Available for purchase in orange, yellow, green, blue, pink or red for $30  and in natural or black for $40 at Bobby Berk
•Available for purchase in white for $30.95 at Architect Gifts Plus.

About designer Jonas Damon:
A graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design, Jonas Damon was raised in Germany and worked in Paris and London before establishing his design consultancy, OFFICE FOR DESIGN, in New York City in 2001. In London he developed furniture and lighting for Tom Dixon’s Eurolounge, before becoming a Design Manager for the European retail group Habitat UK. Jonas Damon’s collaboration with clients ranges from the design of specific products and product lines to shaping the design process as whole. His international client base includes: Dune, Habitat, Harter, Hold Everything, Ideé, Lenox, Lolah, Max Factor, Menu, Smirnoff, Tupperware, 2×4, Umbra, Uslu Airlines, Vitra, and Wedgwood. The work of Jonas Damon and Office for Design has been published and exhibited internationally.

AREAWARE

The QLOCKTWO W. Biegert & Funk’s Beautiful Wall Clock Is Now A Wristwatch.

The QLOCKTWO W
above composite image © If It’s Hip, It’s Here

I blogged about Biegert & Funk’s QLOCKTWO wall clock some years back. A beautiful wall clock that literally spells out the time in words in several different available languages and colors. Since launching the QLOCKTWO, Biegert & Funk turned it into a tabletop alarm clock version and now, a wristwatch. Read more

Pentagram’s Daniel Weil Designs A Clock For An Architect

Privately commissioned to create a gift for an architect, Daniel Weil created a one-of-a-kind clock that is both simple and complex. Reducing objects to their component parts has long fascinated Weil. The Radio in a Bag* he created for his degree show at the Royal College of Art three decades ago is an icon of 20th century industrial design. This clock is the latest demonstration of his interest in investigating not just how objects look, but how they work.


Constructed in ash and nickel-plated brass and silver, the clock is built of five separate elements. The numbers, both hours and minutes, are inscribed on the face and interior of a 9 3/4-inches diameter ring.


The mechanism for setting the time connects with the central mechanism with visible rubber belts.

A single AA battery provides power to the clock through visible power strips that are recessed in the assembly’s base. (Note the different screws that support the battery stand, keyed to the positive and negative poles of the power source.)

And, befitting the object’s recipient, the housing for the central mechanism takes the form of, literally, a house.

Daniel’s sketches for the clock:



“Objects like clocks are both prosaic and profound,” says Weil. “Prosiac because of their ubiquity in everyday life, profound because of the mysterious nature of time itself. Time can be reduced to hours, minutes and seconds, just as a clock can be reduced to its component parts. This doesn’t explain time, but in a way simply exposes its mysterious essence.”

*

above: Daniel Weil. ‘Radio in a bag’, 1983. 28.5 x 20.6 c

above article and images via Pentagram